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Brew Guide: French Press

Brew Guide: French Press

The exact origin of the French Press has been subject to much debate. Folklore says it was an elderly frenchman in the 1850’s, while the Italians claim to have produced the most functional model in the early 1900’s. Of course, the fight to take the credit is understandable, as French Press is one of the most-loved brew methods around the world. For this brew, we used a Bodum 32oz. french press.

Brewing with a French Press is easy, and will take you about 12 minutes.

What You Need

  • French Press
  • Coffee
  • Water
  • Wood Stirrer
  • Gooseneck Kettle
  • Grinder

Amounts 

  • 4 tbsp coffee & 16oz water
  • 8 tbsp coffee & 32oz water
  • 32 grams coffee & 473 grams water
  • 64 grams coffee & 946 grams water

Grounds

To start, we suggest a ratio of 2 tablespoons of grounds for every 8oz of water. The coffee should be ground on the coarsest setting – a #9 on an industrial grinder. If your grounds are too fine, you will get “muddy” coffee in your press.

Water

Heat your water until it’s boiling, and then remove from the heat source for 30 seconds before pouring (boiling water will burn your grounds and ruin your drink!) – The best temperature for brewing is between 195-205 degrees.

Adding Grounds

Drop the grounds into the french press, and pour enough water over them until they are fully covered.

Bloom

Pause and let the coffee bloom for 45 seconds.

Adding Water

Continue to pour the rest of your water into the press. You can now let it brew for 3-5 minutes (personally, we think 4 minutes is the perfect time, but it’s all about your own taste preference).

Breaking the Crust

Once the time is up, use a small bamboo paddle or chopstick (not metal – you don’t want to crack the glass) to break the crust and give the grounds a quick stir.

Now you can put on the lid and press! There should be a small amount of resistance, but not much. If it is difficult to push down, your grounds are probably a bit too fine. If it seems way too easy to press, perhaps your grounds are too coarse.

Enjoy!

Pour into your favorite mug and enjoy your marvelous cup of delicious french press.

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Brew Guide: Chemex

Brew Guide: Chemex

The Chemex was invented in 1941 by German scientist Dr. Peter Schlumbohm. What began as an experiment with basic laboratory tools came to be one of the most classic brew vessels in history. In fact, the Smithsonian, the Museum of Modern Art, and many other museums have the Chemex on permanent display because of it’s rich history and beautiful design. The Chemex might look more like a high school chemistry beaker, but trust us when we say this beauty will give you the smoothest cup of coffee.

Brewing with a Chemex is easy and only takes about 12 minutes.

What You Need

  • Chemex
  • Pre-folded Chemex Filters
  • Water
  • Coffee
  • Gooseneck Kettle
  • Grinder

Amounts:

  • 4 tbsp coffee and 3 cups water
  • 6 tbsp coffee and 6 cups water
  • 8 tbsp coffee and 8 cups water
  • 10 tbsp coffee and 10 cups water
  • 32 grams coffee and 444 grams water
  • 48 grams coffee and 880 grams water
  • 64 grams coffee and 1182 grams water
  • 80 grams coffee and 1478 grams water

Grounds:

Grind your coffee on a coarse grind – for industrial grinders, a #9 setting – to get the best cup of Chemex. If your grind is too fine, it’ll back up the filter and cause it to rip. We learned this the hard and messy way!

Water:

Bring your water to a boil and then remove from heat. Never pour boiling water straight onto coffee grounds – it will scorch them and give your coffee a burnt flavor. Allow the water to cool for 30 seconds (the temperature should be between 195-205) before you proceed to the next step

Filter:

Chemex filters are a bit unusual. As much as you’ll want to, don’t unfold it all the way. Instead, pull just one edge away from the three others. Now your filter will resemble a normal pour-over filter. There will be one edge on one side, and three on the other. Set it into the Chemex with the crease sitting in the pouring channel. Cone filters you use for pour-over, like a #4 or #6, won’t fit properly in a Chemex and are too thin to properly filter for Chemex. Only use Chemex filters.

Use your hot water to give the filter a quick rinse, which removes any papery taste that the filter might add to your coffee. This hot water will also heat the carafe – keeping your coffee hotter for longer. Dump out the excess water before beginning your brew.

To add grounds, measure your desired amount and pour them into your filter. Gently shake the Chemex to level out your grounds. You’re now ready to start the brewing process.

Begin pouring the water over the grounds in a circular pattern, until the water has barely covered the grounds. Let it bloom for 30 seconds.

After the bloom, continue pouring water in a circular motion until the water is about a quarter-inch below the top of the Chemex. Be careful to wait for the water to filter through before pouring more. It’s easy to get carried away and pour too much water. Continue to pour until you’ve used all your water.

Grab your favorite mug and discover a new bold take on your favorite Camano Island Coffee Roast.

Video Tutorial

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Brew Guide: Keurig

Brew Guide: Keurig

The Keurig is one of America’s new favorite ways to brew single-serve coffee. It’s fast and easy, but all those disposable K-cups can be harmful to the environment and your wallet.  How can you avoid these problems? By using a refillable filter like the Solofill, you can save money and do your part to care for our environment.

Using a Keurig is really easy and only takes about 5 minutes.

What You Need

  • Keurig
  • Solofill
  • Water
  • Coffee
  • Burr Grinder

Amounts

For a 6 oz cup, scoop 1 tablespoon grounds into the filter.  For an 8 oz cup, use 2 tablespoons.

Grounds

First, you’ll want your coffee ground to a medium grind – a #6 on an industrial grinder. This is important, because a course grind will produce a weak coffee, but a fine grind will clog the machine.

Filter

Use a spoon to scoop the grounds into the filter, and run your finger around the rim to clear any grounds. By removing the excess grounds, you are ensuring the lid seals properly and therefore preventing it from making a big mess – you don’t want to learn this the hard way!

Brew

Once you’re ready, close the top of the lid and place your favorite coffee mug underneath the spout. Press the “Brew” button and in just a minute you can enjoy your fresh Camano Island Coffee!

Final Steps

You might be tempted to try to brew twice using the same grounds, but don’t do it! The second round will taste like coffee-tinged water.  Simply let the used grounds cool a bit, dump them out, give the filter a quick rinse, and you’re ready to brew another cup.

Enjoy

Sit back, relax, and enjoy the simplicity of the Keurig matched with the taste of your favorite Camano Island Coffee.

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Brew Guide: Aeropress

Brew Guide: Aeropress

Aerobie, the company that invented the Aeropress, is not a coffee company by origin. Their first product was actually the Aerobie Pro – A flying disk. Alan Adler, the founder of the company, had invented many disk-like toys before he invented the Aeropress. Today, Aeropress is Aerobie’s #1 product and an extremely popular method of one cup brewing. The Aeropress produces an espresso strength coffee and as a result, has become known as the “poor man’s espresso.”

Aeropress is a pretty easy brew and only takes around 10 minutes.

What You Need

  • Aeropress
  • Tools Included
  • Water
  • Coffee
  • Circular Filter
  • Gooseneck Kettle
  • Grinder

Amounts

1 scoop coffee & 12 oz water 16 grams coffee & 355 grams water

You’ll want one heaping Aeropress scoop of finely ground coffee to start – a #4 grind on industrial machines.

To prepare your water, bring it to a boil and then remove from heat. Never pour boiling water straight onto coffee grounds – it will scorch them and give your coffee a burnt flavor. Allow the water to cool for 30 seconds (the temperature should be between 195-205) before you proceed to the next step.

Place the paper filter into the plastic filter, screw it onto the Aeropress and set it over your mug. From here, you can wet the filter with your hot water, to remove the papery taste and heat your press and mug. Dump out the water before proceeding.

Drop the grounds into the cylinder, and add just enough water to cover them. Let them bloom for 30 seconds before continuing.

After the bloom, pour more hot water into the Aeropress, until the water level is just above the blue number 3.

Use the paddle that comes with your press to give the grounds a stir for about 5 seconds, then place the plunger into the tube. From here, slowly press the coffee through the filter until you hear a hissing noise.

Add hot water for an americano, Steam milk for a latte, or drink it straight. ENJOY!!!
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How To Use a French Press

How To Use a French Press

On Camano, at CICR’s roasting building or by phone, we are frequently asked questions about proper preparation techniques for coffee. One of the most popular brewing methods is using a french press pot. Read on to learn how to use a french press.

An Introduction

The french press is considered by many to be the best way to enjoy the true flavor of the coffee. If there was a college course on coffee, How to use a french press would be in Coffee 101! The preparation of the drink allows more sediment to be included in the beverage, making it a strong, rich, cup of coffee. After brewing, the ground coffee beans remain in contact with the brewed coffee causing the flavor to grow stronger and at some point, turn bitter. It’s generally considered to be “expired” or “old” after 20 minutes or more of contact with the water. One interesting thing about our coffee is that you’ll find the flavor will last well past that 20 minute point due to the extreme smoothness of our high quality, shade-grown, and ethical coffee beans. We still recommend consuming it prior to 20 minutes but if you don’t, don’t throw it out! You may still really enjoy it!

On to the brewing…

Great! Let’s get started. French Press is painless and easy but to cut back any confusion (in case you’ve pulled out that french press in the back of your cupboard and are following along), I’m going to do a numbered list to help guide you through the preparation steps.

How to Use a French Press in 12 Steps

  1. Start a pot of water boiling.
  2. While the water is boiling, it’s time to get your other items accumulated and ready. You’ll need a grinder, a scoop or some utensil for measuring your coffee into the french press, a french press, and a mug or two for the finished product.
  3. Once the water is at a boiling temperature, it’s time to start the process.
  4. Turn off the burner and remove the pot so the water can cool slightly. By the time we are done, it should be very close to the exact temperature we are aiming for.
  5. Grind your coffee beans on your grinder’s coarsest setting.
  6. After grinding, immediately scoop the desire amount of coffee into your french press. (A good starting point is about 8.5 grams of coffee per 4 ounces of water – then adjust to taste).
  7. By this point, your water should be perfect temperature.
  8. Fill the pot up towards the top moving the stream around to saturate all the ground coffee beans. (Make sure and save some space for the plunger mechanism)
  9. Add the top and plunge down slightly to completely submerse all the grounds in the water.
  10. Wait. 2-3 minutes for smaller, personal french presses is a great time and 4 minutes for larger ones. (I personally will err on the side of waiting too long rather than not long enough to make sure I get a good extraction)
  11. It’s time! Slowly and steadily press the plunger down while trying not to let the rod bend or bow.
  12. Serve and enjoy! ~ That’s how to use a french press!

Note: I’m writing this assuming you use a good burr grinder (either flat burr or conical burr). If your coffee comes pre ground coffee beans or you use a small hand grinder, I HIGHLY recommend that you looking into purchasing a burr grinder (for the sake of a good, consistent, fresh grind) and promise you’ll love your coffee all that much more!
It’s really easy! After you do it one or two times, you’ll become a pro and be making it often in the future. While french pressed coffee is very popular, coffee is a wonderful product in that there are so many ways to enjoy it. Each individual finds their own way of enjoying every last drop. Keep your eyes peeled for more “Coffee Making” posts and you’ll be able to brew the perfect cup of coffee no matter what you’re presented with.
Until next time, Press Away!

Dan – CICR

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Brew Guide: Steamed Milk

Brew Guide: Steamed Milk

The art of steaming milk is tricky, but worth the dedication required to learn. Keep a close eye on all the small details, and with practice you can become a true pro.

Steaming milk can be difficult, and takes around 4 minutes to do.

What You Need

  • Milk
  • Espresso Machine with a steamwand
  • Pitcher
  • Cloth

Pour Milk

To start, pour milk into your pitcher till it’s about half full. You will need the extra room to properly steam your milk and achieve fantastic foam.

Steaming Your Milk

Before starting the steaming process, be sure to give a quick pull on the handle to bleed the steam wand. This removes any water from the wand. Once you’ve done this, submerge the wand in the milk and begin to steam. Slowly lower the pitcher so just the tip is submerged. Small microfoam will begin to form and the milk will expand. Do this slowly so that no large bubbles are created. The milk should swirl like a whirlpool and incorporate the microfoam into the pitcher of milk. Slowly continue to draw the pitcher down until you have your desired amount of foam. Now you can move the wand completely under the surface of the milk (but not touching the bottom of the pitcher) and hold steady.

Achieving Optimum Temperature

We recommend the use of a thermometer to make sure your milk is the perfect temperature of 160 degrees. To achieve this optimum temperature steam your milk until your thermometer reaches 150 degrees, then shut off the steamwand. The milk will continue to heat a few more degrees once you shut off the steam, hitting the desired temperature of 160 degrees.

Finish

Remove the pitcher from the wand, bleed the steamer once more, and wipe clean with a damp towel. This clears away any milk residue that may be left behind, so your machine will always steam properly and stay completely clean inside.

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Brew Guide: Espresso

Brew Guide: Espresso

Espresso was invented as a way to make coffee expressly, as people were in a hurry and didn’t have time to wait 10 minutes to brew their morning pot of coffee. However, over the years, espresso has become more about the taste than the speed. The rich, strong flavor is something that coffee drinkers around the world look forward to every morning.

Espresso is a tricky brewing method and takes roughly 4 minutes to complete.

What You Need

  • Coffee
  • Espresso Machine
  • Portafilter
  • Cloth

Grounds

Grind your coffee on a fine grind – #1 on an industrial grinder. For a double shot, you’ll want 15 grams of coffee, which is equal to a smidge less than 2 tablespoons.

Adding Grounds

Put the grounds into the portafilter so it forms a little mound on the top. Grab your tamper and press down firmly. Remove the tamper and use the handle to give the side of the filter a quick tap to remove excess grounds, then press again. Give it a quick twist before you remove it so the top is nice and smooth.

Pulling Shots

Insert the portafilter into the machine, making sure that it’s fully locked into its proper position. Place shot glasses or a mug below to catch the shot. Press the button and watch as the shot begins to pour. The best shots take anywhere between 25-33 seconds from pushing the button to finish.

Machine Care

Once you’ve pulled your shot, make sure you properly care for your machine and equipment. Carefully take the portafilter out, remove the used grounds, and give it a quick wipe down with a towel. You should also quickly run some water through the group head on your machine to rinse away any grounds that are stuck in the screen. Place the filter back into the machine for storage, and give your shot glasses a quick rinse.

Bonus tip: If your shots are running too slow, try easing up on the tamping pressure. If they are too long, try tamping harder. If this doesn’t solve your problem, try adding slightly less grounds to the portafilter for a faster pour and adding slightly more for a longer pour. These adjustments will greatly affect the taste of your shots!

Enjoy!!!

Whether you made a latte, americano, or some other fabulous espresso drink, enjoy sipping Camano Island Coffee Roasters – you’ve earned it.

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Brew Guide: Woodneck Coffee

Brew Guide: Woodneck Coffee

Woodneck brewing originated in Japan in the early 1900s. It’s unique flavor comes from the use of a cloth filter and the slow brewing process. We recommend the Woodneck to those who are truly dedicated to the craft of home-brew – it requires patience and precision to get the bold, sweet cup it’s known for.

This brew is intermediate, and takes about 12 minutes.

WHAT YOU NEED

  • Coffee
  • Water
  • Woodneck
  • Cloth Filter
  • Gooseneck Kettle
  • Grinder

AMOUNTS

  • 3 tbsp coffee and 8 oz water
  • 5 tbsp coffee and 13 oz water
  • 24 grams coffee and 236 grams water
  • 40 grams coffee and 385 grams water

GROUNDS

You’ll want to grind your coffee on a medium grind – a #6 for those who have their coffee ground on an industrial machine.

Starting Tips

If you have a new Woodneck cloth filter, make sure you remove the cloth filter from its frame and soak it in boiling water for 5 minutes before beginning to brew.

Water

Heat your water until it’s boiling and then remove it from the heat source. Woodneck brews best with an unusually low temperature of water – around 175 – 185 degrees. Let your water cool for about 1 minute before you begin the brewing process.

FILTER

Place the filter onto the the wire frame, set it over the carafe and pour boiling water through the filter. The main purpose of this step is to warm your vessel prior to brewing to keep your coffee hotter for longer.

ADDING GROUNDS

Once you’ve dumped the water out of your woodneck, place the grounds into your filter. Give it a gentle nudge, so the grounds settle flat.

POUR TO BLOOM

Begin pouring water in a very slow, circular pattern, starting at the edges and working your way towards the middle. When the water has barely covered the grounds, stop and let it bloom for 45 seconds.

CONTINUE POURING

To continue the brew, pour half of the remaining water in the same slow circular fashion as before, and then wait for it to fully filter through. Finally, pour the last round of water very slowly until the filter is full and wait for your brew to finish.

FINAL STEPS

Once it has all filtered through, you can set the filter aside. To properly care for your cloth filter, give it a thorough rinse and store it in a small dish of water in your fridge.

ENJOY

Now enjoy your strong, bold cup of Camano Island Coffee.

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Brew Guide: Pour-Over

Brew Guide: Pour-Over

Over the past few centuries, many different inventors and coffee companies have developed their own unique method to Pour-Over coffee. By changing the size of the hole and the pattern of the interior ridges, companies have developed different Pour-Over models that all produce their own unique cup of coffee. For this brew, we used a German “Cilio” pour-over with a size #4 filter.

Pour-Over is extremely easy, and should only take about 10 minutes.

What You Need

  • Pour-Over
  • Filter
  • Coffee
  • Water
  • Wooden Stirrer
  • Gooseneck Kettle
  • Grinder

AMOUNTS

  • 3 tbsp coffee & 12 oz water
  • 4 tbsp coffee & 16 oz water
  • 5 tbsp coffee & 20 oz water
  • 6 tbsp coffee & 24 oz water
  • 24 grams coffee & 355 grams water
  • 32 grams coffee & 473 grams water
  • 40 grams coffee & 591 grams water
  • 48 grams coffee & 709 grams water

Grounds

To start out, measure out your Camano Island Coffee and set your grinder to a medium-fine grind. Also, that’s #5 or autodrip on an industrial grinder.

Water

Bring your water to a boil and then remove from heat. Never pour boiling water straight onto coffee grounds – it will scorch them and give your coffee a burnt flavor. Allow the water to cool for 30 seconds (the temperature should be between 195-205 degrees) before you proceed to the next step.

Filter

Place your filter inside your pour-over, set it on top of your mug, and use hot water to give it a quick rinse. This gets rid of any papery taste the filter might add to the coffee, and warms your mug up, too. Dump out the excess water.

Adding Grounds: Drop the grounds into the filter and give it a small shake so they are distributed evenly.

Pouring: Grab your kettle and begin pouring the water in a slow, circular motion outward from the center. Only pour until the grounds are slightly covered with water, then stop.

Bloom: Let the grounds bloom for 45 seconds, then use a small wooden paddle or chopstick to give the grounds a quick stir. By stirring the grounds you are ensuring they are evenly covered with water, which helps create an even extraction.

2nd Pouring: Continue to pour water in the same circular motion over your coffee until you’ve used all of your water. Remove Pour-Over once the drip has slowed to a near stop.

Enjoy!

You can now enjoy your fresh cup of Pour-Over coffee.

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Brew Guide: Turkish Coffee

Brew Guide: Turkish Coffee

Coffee is a huge part of Turkish culture. In fact, traditional houses include special “coffee rooms” specifically for brewing and drinking coffee. In the 17th century, the Turks were spending more time drinking coffee than going to the mosques to pray, so the government made coffee illegal. This, however, didn’t stop the Turks from drinking coffee, and to this day it remains a rich part of their culture.

This brew is difficult, but only takes about 7 minutes.

What You Need

  • Coffee
  • Ibrik
  • Sugar (Optional)
  • Grinder or Turkish Grinder
  • Water

Tools

The ibrik comes in many sizes. A finished cup of turkish is considered 3oz, so the amount of water you use depends on the size of your ibrik and the number of cups you’re serving. You should never fill the ibrik past the neck. Technically, one cup is a tad bit more than 3oz, but we’re using that measurement just to keep things simple.

Grounds

For every 1 cup of water, you should use 1 tablespoon of turkish-ground coffee, which is extremely fine. The best way to get this fine of a grind is to purchase a turkish grinder, but you can also get a similar grind by putting your grinder on the finest setting possible. You’ll find most industrial machines have a turkish setting.

Water/Adding Coffee

Put the water into your ibrik and place it on medium heat. Wait roughly 2 minutes, and then add the grounds into the ibrik. Do not stir the grounds.

Sugar is added by some people who know they prefer it in their brew. If you would like to do this, add sugar on top right after you add the coffee. We recommend a teaspoon to start and you can adjust accordingly next time you brew based on your preferences. Again, do not stir.

Brewing

Once the coffee starts sinking and the sugar begins to dissolve, you can give the coffee a few quick stirs and turn down the heat just a bit. Your coffee will soon begin to bubble a bit on the surface. When you see small bubbles, make sure you turn down the heat even lower. Keep a close eye on your brew – don’t let it boil. A froth will start to rise to the surface. When it does this, remove from heat and let it settle. Once the froth has gone down, put it back on the heat and let it rise once more. Some prefer to let it rise and fall 3-4 times, but we recommend only twice.

Pouring

Take care when pouring your turkish coffee from the ibrik –  Give it a quick initial pour to get the foam, then slow down so most the coffee grounds will stay in the bottom of the vessel and not fall into your cup.

Enjoy

Let it sit for a minute or two, so any grounds that might have slipped into your cup can settle at the bottom. Sit back and enjoy.